Statistics

  • male survivorEvery three minutes, someone is diagnosed with blood cancer – more than 201,870 new cases are expected this year in the United States.

  • More than 387,000 Americans are living with leukemia

  • Nearly 866,000 Americans are living with Hodgkin’s or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

  • An estimated 50,000 to 75,000 people are living with myelodysplastic syndromes in the United States

  • An estimated 118,539 people are living with myeloma in the United States

  • An estimated 68,000 deaths will result from blood cancer this year.

  • Leukemia is diagnosed 10 times more often in adults than children.

  • Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is the 7th most common cancer in the U.S.

  • Every day 170 Americans are diagnosed with leukemia and 67 lose the fight.

  • Every day 220 Americans are diagnosed with lymphoma and 58 lose the fight.

  • Leukemia strikes males and females of all ages and all races. It does not discriminate.

  • The five-year relative survival rate for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and leukemia is about 7% lower for African-Americans than that of whites.

  • Leukemia is the most common cancer in Hispanic children and adolescents; five-year relative survival rate is 3-4% lower for Hispanics than that of non-Hispanic whites.